EcoSteps

We are a leader in the dining industry when it comes to sustainability. Company-wide programs aim to reduce our environmental impact through lowered energy usage, decreased waste, and local sourcing.

Sometimes, small steps have a big impact. That’s where our EcoSteps program comes in. EcoSteps illustrates the progress we have made to address sustainable food service, "green" our dining operations, and expand our role as a socially responsible organization. Preserving our planet’s resources for future generations is of the utmost importance.

We took our first big EcoStep in 2002, when we developed our FarmSource program to put locally-produced products onto our guests’ plates. Since then, we’ve expanded FarmSource and taken many more steps toward sustainability.

Click on any item in the timeline below for more information.

PARKHURST SERVES CHATHAM EDEN HALL, MOST SUSTAINABLE CAMPUS IN WORLD

GARDEN PRIMER STARTS FOR NEW CAMPUSES

PARKHURST DINING LAUNCHES A BLOG WITH A FOCUS ON SUSTAINABILITY

ENPHG DEVELOPS FARMER/CHEF COLLABORATION TRACK FOR 21ST ANNUAL PASA “FARMING FOR FUTURE” CONFERENCE

PARKHURST’S GOOGLE ACCOUNT RECEIVES “ZERO WASTE” CERTIFICATION FROM PENNSYLVANIA RESOURCE COUNCIL

KNOW YOUR SOURCE PROGRAM INTRODUCED TO PARKHURST

PARKHURST TRANSITIONS TO CAGE-FREE EGGS

ENPHG RECOGNIZED BY PITTSBURGH MAGAZINE FOR BEST GREEN OPERATIONS

ENPHG'S DIRECTOR OF SOURCING AND SUSTAINABILITY CERTIFIED AS AN ORGANIC CROP INSPECTOR

PARKHURST BEGINS WORKING WITH COMMUNITY-SUPPORTED PROGRAMS

PARKHURST SWITCHES TO ONLY rBGH/rBST-FREE MILK

FARMSOURCE PROGRAM DEVELOPED

2016
2015
2014
2013
2012
2011
2010
2009
2008
2007
2006
2005
2002

PARKHURST PARTICIPATES IN BALTIMORE INTEGRATION PARTNERSHIP

ENPHG PARTICIPATES IN JAMIE OLIVER’S FOOD REVOLUTION DAY

ENPHG PURCHASES OVER $23 MILLION IN LOCALLY-PRODUCED FOOD THROUGH FARMSOURCE

GROWER’S MANUAL INTRODUCED FOR BACKYARD GARDENS

PARKHURST’S FOUR BAYER HEALTHCARE ACCOUNTS ACHIEVE 90% WASTE DIVERSION FROM LANDFILLS

DIGITAL SMILEAGE INTRODUCED TO REDUCE PRINTED MARKETING MATERIALS

ENPHG RECEIVES GLYNWOOD HARVEST AWARD FOR INNOVATION AND LEADERSHIP IN THE SUSTAINABLE FOOD MOVEMENT

PARKHURST BEGINS COMPOSTING/ORGANIC RECYCLING

ENPHG SENDS REPRESENTATIVE TO EUROPEAN UNION ORGANIC FOOD WASTE TOUR

GREEN STANDARDS DEVELOPED FOR ALL ENPHG BRANDS

ENPHG REDUCES PAYROLL WASTE BY ELIMINATING PAPER CHECKS

2016
PARKHURST SERVES CHATHAM EDEN HALL, MOST SUSTAINABLE CAMPUS IN WORLD

A 388-acre farm/campus and home to the Falk School of Sustainability, Chatham University is the first academic community in the world built from the ground up for the study of sustainable living, learning, and development. Parkhurst is proud to be the university's dining partner to support the sustainability and environmental education of this program.  

2015
PARKHURST PARTICIPATES IN BALTIMORE INTEGRATION PARTNERSHIP

The Baltimore Integration Partnership is a coalition of 10 anchor institutions and local foundations and nonprofits that promote job creation through local hiring and buying.

2014
GARDEN PRIMER STARTS FOR NEW CAMPUSES

Through a collaboration with Grow Pittsburgh, the “Garden Primer” is a teaching class for Parkhurst Chefs showcasing how to grow organic gardens

2013
ENPHG PARTICIPATES IN JAMIE OLIVER’S FOOD REVOLUTION DAY

Food Revolution Day is a global day of action to raise awareness about the importance of good food and better food education for everyone by focusing on three simple actions – cook it, share it, live it.  Parkhurst Dining participated by highlighting dishes featuring fresh ingredients, and with every order, included a recipe book and spice pack to encourage guests to do their own healthy cooking.

PARKHURST DINING LAUNCHES A BLOG WITH A FOCUS ON SUSTAINABILITY

DineAtParkhurst.wordpress.com follows our chefs and managers as they visit and learn more about our local farmers, producers, and manufacturers. Knowing the source of our food is extremely important to us, and through this blog, we're able to share that information with our guests and clients.

2012
ENPHG PURCHASES OVER $23 MILLION IN LOCALLY-PRODUCED FOOD THROUGH FARMSOURCE

ENPHG, including member company Parkhurst Dining continues to source more than 20% of its food locally by procuring $23 million in food and beverage purchases from local companies in 2011, a 13% increase over 2010 local purchases.

ENPHG DEVELOPS FARMER/CHEF COLLABORATION TRACK FOR 21ST ANNUAL PASA “FARMING FOR FUTURE” CONFERENCE

During this track, chefs were introduced to local producers and their products; they discussed preparation techniques and learned how others are using local foods. In addition to organizing the session, 20 of our chefs from Parkhurst were among the attendees.

2011
GROWER’S MANUAL INTRODUCED FOR BACKYARD GARDENS

At many of our Parkhurst locations, guests enjoy fresh produce, vegetables and herbs that are grown in containers, greenhouses or college-based farms located right on our clients' property. On-site gardening provides a fresh and consistent food source to dining and helps our clients become more sustainable. Our Grower’s Manual assists our accounts in creating and maintaining these gardens.

At the Lion’s Den Rooftop Terrace of Reed Smith, a Pittsburgh global relationship law firm, Parkhurst Dining Executive Chef Jeff Shaffer grows four different kinds of tomatoes including beefsteak, speckled Roma, tigerella, and banana legs, an heirloom variety that produces so many tomatoes late in the season you can barely make out foliage amongst the tightly clumped fruits! 

PARKHURST’S GOOGLE ACCOUNT RECEIVES “ZERO WASTE” CERTIFICATION FROM PENNSYLVANIA RESOURCE COUNCIL

“Zero Waste in Pittsburgh” (ZIP) certification is intended to encourage, reward and acknowledge organizations that have taken important steps towards reducing the waste they produce through recycling, composting and source reduction measures. Parkhurst became the first foodservice company in Allegheny County to receive this certification for the steps they’ve taken at our Google account.

PARKHURST’S FOUR BAYER HEALTHCARE ACCOUNTS ACHIEVE 90% WASTE DIVERSION FROM LANDFILLS

Our Parkhurst teams at these four accounts worked together to implement a comprehensive composting program to complement the recycling that they were already doing at these locations. Implementation of the program included extensive team member training and partnership with a local composting operator. Now, between recycling and composting, 90% of Bayer HealthCare’s waste is diverted from landfills. Additionally, the compost created by the program is used to fertilize the sites’ on-site gardens, from which fresh produce and herbs are incorporated into the daily menu features.

2010
KNOW YOUR SOURCE PROGRAM INTRODUCED TO PARKHURST

Through our “Know your Source” program, we have physically identified the sources where our products originated. We visit with these farms and/or manufacturers to fully understand their growing practices, sustainable accomplishments and their social commitment to their employees and the communities where they do business.

Farm tours are abundant during the growing season.  Parkhurst chefs and managers have toured Susquehanna Mills of Montoursville, PA, a provider of natural cooking oils pressed from locally grown crops. Susquehanna presses an assorted variety of oil crops such as canola, sunflower and soybean to name a few.  Parkhurst purchases their GMO Free canola oil as the primary ingredient in making their house-made salad dressings.  Going to the source of our supply is an awesome way for Parkhurst team members to tell the story behind the product!

DIGITAL SMILEAGE INTRODUCED TO REDUCE PRINTED MARKETING MATERIALS

Digital Smileage is the term we’ve coined for our digital marketing screens, which allow us to save trees and landfill space by reducing or eliminating printed marketing materials wherever Digital Smileage is used. Digital Smileage has replaced items such as daily specials cards, brochures, handouts, and menu boards at several of our Parkhurst accounts and Eat’n Park restaurant locations.

PARKHURST TRANSITIONS TO CAGE-FREE EGGS

100% of Parkhurst’s shell eggs are a cage-free organic product. 

Parkhurst’s cage-free eggs come from a producer who allows hens to engage in natural behaviors like nesting, perching and dust-bathing. Cage-free hens live in large flocks that are able to walk, spread their wings and lay their eggs in nests.

Parkhurst also commits to using 100% cage-free liquid eggs by 2020.  

2009
ENPHG RECEIVES GLYNWOOD HARVEST AWARD FOR INNOVATION AND LEADERSHIP IN THE SUSTAINABLE FOOD MOVEMENT

Glynwood, a not-for-profit organization whose mission is to save farming in the Northeast, awarded Eat’n Park Hospitality Group the 7th Annual Harvest Award. This award highlights innovative work being done to increase access to fresh, locally-produced food, and recognizes leaders across the country who support regional agricultural systems.

ENPHG RECOGNIZED BY PITTSBURGH MAGAZINE FOR BEST GREEN OPERATIONS

Pittsburgh Magazine recognized us for the steps we’ve taken across all divisions to reduce our environmental impact, including:

  • Reducing paper waste by eliminating paper placemats and paper towels at Eat’n Park Restaurants
  • Establishing sustainability committees within the educational institutions and businesses that we serve through our Parkhurst division
  • Developing composting and waste recycling programs at our Parkhurst locations
2008
PARKHURST BEGINS COMPOSTING/ORGANIC RECYCLING

Parkhurst develops and implements composting programs that recycle organic waste, such as food and yard wastes, into humus, a soil-like material that can be used in vegetable and flower gardens, landscaping and many other applications.

Several Parkhurst locations are composting pre- and post-consumer food waste.  Compostable waste is picked up by local composters who provide sustainable waste management solutions to our accounts.

ENPHG'S DIRECTOR OF SOURCING AND SUSTAINABILITY CERTIFIED AS AN ORGANIC CROP INSPECTOR

The International Organic Inspectors Association (IOIA) is a non-profit, professional association of organic farm, livestock, and process inspectors dedicated to verification of organic production practices. The mission of IOIA is to address issues and concerns relevant to organic inspectors, to provide quality inspector training and to promote integrity and consistency in the organic certification process.  Jamie Moore, Director of Sourcing and Sustainability, manages our relationships with local farmers. Jamie sought IOIA certification so he would be knowledgeable about the growing practices of the farmers and producers that we purchase from.

2007
ENPHG SENDS REPRESENTATIVE TO EUROPEAN UNION ORGANIC FOOD WASTE TOUR

In 2006 and 2007, two groups of Pennsylvania professionals, under a USDA-sponsored project and assembled by The Pennsylvania State University, traveled to Germany and Austria to investigate the structures, operations, and sustainability of the organic recycling systems that have been developed and implemented in these two countries. The purpose of the trip was to analyze these systems and their applicability to organic recycling for Pennsylvania.

2006
PARKHURST BEGINS WORKING WITH COMMUNITY-SUPPORTED PROGRAMS

From a handful of farms 15 years ago, the community-supported agriculture (CSA) concept has grown to as many as 5,000 nationwide.  People sign up for CSA, pay a regular fee and receive a weekly box of farm goods, generally delivered somewhere in their own neighborhood.

Parkhurst takes it one step further by creating opportunities for smaller farms to sell and deliver fresh produce to our clients’ associates and other guests – while Parkhurst chefs prepare and present recipe ideas using the fresh food harvested from the CSA farms.

The University of the Arts in Philadelphia (UArts) and Parkhurst started a CSA that gives Delaware Valley FarmShare, a partnership of local family farms in PA, NJ and DE, an opportunity to sell and deliver pre-purchased shares of their harvest to university staffers and faculty. To date, over 30 University staffers and faculty members have purchased shares from the CSA program which starts in May, and will receive a box of farm goods every other week through the end of October.  This is a great opportunity to have these farmers receive a dependable source of income, while creating opportunities for our clients’ employees to receive fresh fruits, vegetables and dairy products, far fresher than anything you can get at the store!

GREEN STANDARDS DEVELOPED FOR ALL ENPHG BRANDS

Our Green Standards provide our restaurants and locations with guidelines for greening our dining operations. Some of our green standards include:

  • Produce – seasonal produce sourced within 125 miles of the facility
  • Dairy – produced without the use of rBST
  • Meat – purchased from regional farms when available
  • Partnering with Seafood Watch to increase our use of sustainable seafood
  • Recycled paper used for a majority of marketing materials
  • Use of washable, reusable service ware and utensils where applicable
  • Napkins made from recycled paper
2005
PARKHURST SWITCHES TO ONLY rBGH/rBST-FREE MILK

We only purchase fluid milk that comes from independently owned family farms that do not use rBST/rBGH to increase their cows’ milk production. We purchase from these dairies because we believe in preserving the natural milk supply for our locations. 

Recombinant bovine somatotropin hormone, sometimes referred as BGH, rBGH and BST, is a genetically engineered copy of a naturally occurring hormone produced by cows. The naturally occurring hormone regulates the amount of milk a cow can produce; the genetically engineered copy of the hormone is used specifically to boost those amounts, in turn producing more milk. According to the FDA, no significant difference has been shown and no test can distinguish between milk from rBGH-treated and untreated cows.

ENPHG REDUCES PAYROLL WASTE BY ELIMINATING PAPER CHECKS

When you employ nearly 10,000 team members, paychecks add up to quite a bit of paper over the course of a year. We switched to an all-electronic paycard system to reduce this waste.

2002
FARMSOURCE PROGRAM DEVELOPED

The introduction of our FarmSource program in 2002 pioneered the creation of the infrastructure needed to get local products into the hands of our suppliers and onto the plates of our guests. Today, we work with more than 250 local farmers and producers, all within a 150-mile radius of our locations.

This program greatly reduces the distance food travels from harvest to table. This decreases air pollution, water pollution, traffic congestion and the need for oil. 

Because of FarmSource, our guests enjoy fresh, wholesome foods, including:

  • Produce that is selected through farmer-based organizations
  • Dairy products that come from independently owned and operated local farm families that choose not to treat their herds with rBGH/rBST
  • Meat that is produced at USDA-inspected facilities, which source their animals from farms that are within the region and ensure high standards of animal care, well-being and nutrition
  • Products from local artisans who devote their time, energy and passion to a limited line of products and emphasize high quality and unique flavors